Sleep in comfort tonight and keep your head warmChill Frill helps to keep your head warmer while you sleep

BIOGRAPHY

Star About the Creator of Chill Frill pillowcaseStar


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Julie was born in Rhode Island where she lived until she was 16 years old. At that age, her mother moved to Pasadena, California, and Julie graduated from Pasadena High School. After high school,Julie, the Creator of the Chill Frill Pillowcase she attended Pasadena City College, hoping to further her drafting studies to include architectural drafting. In 1958, before we all became "politically correct", Julie was told that she would not be allowed to take the second semester of drafting because she was the only female in the class and the boys did not want her there. An uncle, a career Navy man, suggested that she join the Navy and go to drafting school. Julie joined the Navy and became a WAVE in February 1959 only to learn that the drafting school had been closed to women in January. Julie asked to "get out" but was told she had to stay. Not only did she have to stay, and not become a draftsman, but she would have to go to school to become a Radioman and learn electronics and Morse Code. At that point, Julie realized that life is strange: she was not allowed to take drafting because she was the only female, but she was sent to Radioman School as the only female in a class of 60 in a school of 300 men.

After four years in the Navy (enlisting for three but having to extend to go to a school she didn't want to attend), Julie returned to college to pursue her dreams of becoming an architect. While she continued her studies, she was in a car accident which took a year out of her life. After that, she realized that she would not be able to follow her dream and she tried many jobs.



At the age of 30, as a secretary for a Los Angeles builder, Julie "discovered" construction and took to it like a duck takes to water. After 13 years of working for several construction companies, she decided to become a licensed general contractor and started her own company which specialized in remodeling restaurants, churches, and doing tenant improvement work in San Diego.


After taking an early retirement, Julie bought a Class A motor home and returned to Rhode Island. Fortunately, her best friend from Pasadena had moved to New Hampshire, giving Julie a connection on the East Coast.


It was while she was in New Hampshire for Thanksgiving in 1998 that the idea for the head-warming pillowcase came to her. Her friend, Sara, wanted Julie to sleep in the guest room because it was snowing and she was concerned about Julie sleeping in the motor home. Since the aging standard poodle could not make the stairs in the home, Julie responded that she could not use the guest room. Sara inquired whether or not her friend would get cold, and Julie stated that only her head would be cold. In response, Sara remarked that Roy, her husband, had the same problem. Roy's head would get cold and he would go under the covers, not be able to breathe, come out from under the covers, get cold again and so on.


Once Julie returned to Rhode Island after Thanksgiving, she began working on her idea and eventually made ten prototypes, sending many of them to Roy to test. Along the way, she decided on a name for her product which describes exactly what the product is - Chill Frill. It is a frill which helps prevent a chill.


From the development of the idea in November 1998, to receiving the patent in April 2002, was a long journey. In 1999, Sheila Hoogeboom of The Center for Design & Business at the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) offered a class for inventors and entrepreneurs. Julie took the course and continues to benefit from the experience and mentoring. Through RISD, she was led to patent attorney, Cristina Offenberg, Newport, Rhode Island, who successfully wrote the patent application which went through without a hitch, yet the process still took the usual 18 months.


During the waiting period, Julie hired a graphic artist in Providence, Rhode Island, to create a logo. The sheep, denoting counting sheep because you can't sleep, was selected and then the name was trademarked. Concurrently, there was a continued search for the perfect textile. It had to be made in the US and be 100% cotton flannel. Most flannel is made overseas so this was quite a task, but the most perfect flannel was found.


The next step was to test a larger market (to go beyond just Julie and Roy) so she invited, coaxed, or threatened 100 participants to partake in this endeavor, resulting in a 98% positive response. At one time, she believed that someone going through chemotherapy would have a cold head from the loss of hair; however, she learned that if the person's head did not get cold before losing their hair, the head did not necessarily get cold without hair. She also learned that many people who stated that their head did not get cold, still enjoyed the pillowcase. The responses to the test market questionnaire showed that many with migraine headaches had benefited, as well as those with stiff necks, earaches, sinus infections, and those who wanted to block out the light. Although the product is not advertised as any type of cure for the above ailments, it might help some individuals. The test market also showed that the pillowcase was easy to travel with, whether camping, boating, or flying. In the case of camping and flying, the user can take just the pillowcase and fill it with clothes or something soft and still receive the same benefit without using a pillow. Boaters usually have pillows onboard.


Julie contracted with NatCo Label Company in Glendale, California to make the satin woven labels. She was able to find this label company through Steve Schneider of the Sawyer Center of the Small Business Development Center (SBDC) in Santa Rosa, California, whom she had met at a business seminar. Randy Nelson of the Yuma SBDC office has also assisted with ideas for a brochure, a contact to get an
article published in the Yuma Sun Newspaper written by Matt Riehl, and provided all around support based on belief in the product.


And that brings us to the present....

 

The Man in the Moon Sleeping Man in the Moon needs a sleeping cap to get a good night's sleep.
Now, all you need is a Chill FRILL Pillowcase!!!

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